Preparing for Google’s simplified match types

No items found.

As part of its effort to make search results more relevant for users, yesterday Google announced major changes to keyword match type functionality. The changes are sweeping but do not require immediate campaign updates. That said, brands must revisit campaign set up over the next two to three months to ensure optimal performance. 

What’s changing?

Starting in mid-February, phrase match keywords on a small percent of Google traffic will serve on queries relevant not just to the specific word order of the phrase match, but to the keyword’s meaning. 

Simultaneously, Google will change the broad match modifier (BMM) match type to adhere to the same methodology as phrase match, removing the need to have both match types live in an account. Google will phase out new BMM keywords in July 2021, although existing BMM keywords will remain functional for the foreseeable future. 

Last, Google will update exact match keywords to ensure that literal matches to the keyword or misspellings will only match to the exact match keyword. These types of queries will no longer match to another keyword or different match type (phrase or broad) with a higher ad rank or bid. This means advertisers will no longer need to create complex constraints using campaign structure or negative keywords for  search traffic to funnel appropriately. 

Negative keyword match types will remain unchanged. 

Google is prioritizing eight languages for initial rollout, including English, German, Spanish, French, Italian, Dutch, Portuguese, and Russian. Changes will be implemented in every language by July.

Impact for advertisers

Updates to match types will not change smart bidding functionality or capabilities and should not require changes to KPI targets. 

However, search accounts that heavily rely on BMM keywords should expect a decrease in traffic as a result of these more restrictive matching rules.

Campaigns that fully modify BMM keywords (e.g., “+Kitchen +Sink” instead of “+Kitchen Sink”) can expect single digit percent declines in impressions & clicks. However, campaigns using only partially modified BMM keywords can expect a larger decrease in traffic, as today, any non-modified words in a BMM keyword string act as full broad match and can serve on queries that do not contain every word in the keyword string. Once the BMM changes are live, this will no longer be the case.

But there’s some good news. The decrease in BMM volume will likely be offset by improved relevance in query matching. The changes should also increase phrase match keyword volume, but likely not to the scale of current BMM keyword volume. That additional volume will be driven by phrase match keywords becoming eligible to serve on queries that are relevant to the meaning of the keyword, not just ones that contain the keyword string in its exact order. BMM keywords historically would match into any query that contained all words in the keyword string, regardless of the desired intent of the keyword. 

What to do next

As brands revise campaign setup in preparation for these changes, Kepler recommends that new keyword or campaign builds include phrase match instead of BMM. Existing BMM keywords should not be deprecated or transitioned to phrase match prior to Google’s full transition.

Until then, brands should closely monitor performance and search query reports to evaluate any changes resulting from new match type behaviors. Spend, impression and click volume can vary across phrase and BMM match types, so it will be crucial to adjust budgets accordingly.

After the full transition, and once brands understand how these changes have impacted campaign performance, they should assess whether exact and phrase match types drive the scale they need. If not, brands should consider testing into broad match keywords across select high performing terms. 

To note, Bing has not communicated any changes to its match types. As Kepler learns more, we’ll share details and recommended actions.

Preparing for Google’s simplified match types

Article Source Link

As part of its effort to make search results more relevant for users, yesterday Google announced major changes to keyword match type functionality. The changes are sweeping but do not require immediate campaign updates. That said, brands must revisit campaign set up over the next two to three months to ensure optimal performance. 

What’s changing?

Starting in mid-February, phrase match keywords on a small percent of Google traffic will serve on queries relevant not just to the specific word order of the phrase match, but to the keyword’s meaning. 

Simultaneously, Google will change the broad match modifier (BMM) match type to adhere to the same methodology as phrase match, removing the need to have both match types live in an account. Google will phase out new BMM keywords in July 2021, although existing BMM keywords will remain functional for the foreseeable future. 

Last, Google will update exact match keywords to ensure that literal matches to the keyword or misspellings will only match to the exact match keyword. These types of queries will no longer match to another keyword or different match type (phrase or broad) with a higher ad rank or bid. This means advertisers will no longer need to create complex constraints using campaign structure or negative keywords for  search traffic to funnel appropriately. 

Negative keyword match types will remain unchanged. 

Google is prioritizing eight languages for initial rollout, including English, German, Spanish, French, Italian, Dutch, Portuguese, and Russian. Changes will be implemented in every language by July.

Impact for advertisers

Updates to match types will not change smart bidding functionality or capabilities and should not require changes to KPI targets. 

However, search accounts that heavily rely on BMM keywords should expect a decrease in traffic as a result of these more restrictive matching rules.

Campaigns that fully modify BMM keywords (e.g., “+Kitchen +Sink” instead of “+Kitchen Sink”) can expect single digit percent declines in impressions & clicks. However, campaigns using only partially modified BMM keywords can expect a larger decrease in traffic, as today, any non-modified words in a BMM keyword string act as full broad match and can serve on queries that do not contain every word in the keyword string. Once the BMM changes are live, this will no longer be the case.

But there’s some good news. The decrease in BMM volume will likely be offset by improved relevance in query matching. The changes should also increase phrase match keyword volume, but likely not to the scale of current BMM keyword volume. That additional volume will be driven by phrase match keywords becoming eligible to serve on queries that are relevant to the meaning of the keyword, not just ones that contain the keyword string in its exact order. BMM keywords historically would match into any query that contained all words in the keyword string, regardless of the desired intent of the keyword. 

What to do next

As brands revise campaign setup in preparation for these changes, Kepler recommends that new keyword or campaign builds include phrase match instead of BMM. Existing BMM keywords should not be deprecated or transitioned to phrase match prior to Google’s full transition.

Until then, brands should closely monitor performance and search query reports to evaluate any changes resulting from new match type behaviors. Spend, impression and click volume can vary across phrase and BMM match types, so it will be crucial to adjust budgets accordingly.

After the full transition, and once brands understand how these changes have impacted campaign performance, they should assess whether exact and phrase match types drive the scale they need. If not, brands should consider testing into broad match keywords across select high performing terms. 

To note, Bing has not communicated any changes to its match types. As Kepler learns more, we’ll share details and recommended actions.

More News from Kepler Group

Google prioritizes responsive search ads

Google announced responsive search ads will be replacing expanded text ads (ETAs) as the new default ad type for Google search campaigns.

Read More

Futureproofing: Data Clean Rooms (DCRs)

As the data and measurement landscape changes, DCRs are an alternative to the cookie for campaign performance tracking. Click to learn how DCRs work.

Read More

Is it time to advertise on TikTok?

TikTok's scale and shoppable ad formats have attracted advertisers. But brands need smart targeting & custom creative to make an impact.

Read More

Video is bigger than just TV. Plan accordingly.

It's time to plan TV and digital video holistically as consumers spend more viewing time on streaming TV.

Read More

Navigating Facebook’s iOS14 Updates

Apple’s iOS 14 privacy updates will have sweeping impact. Read how resulting Facebook measurement changes will affect all web and app advertisers.

Read More

Test podcasts for your direct response campaign

As podcast grows & traditional channels decline, podcasts have advanced to meet the needs of advertisers across their media mix goals.

Read More

Kepler University and "Graduate Level" programs expand

Kepler has recently expanded its rigorous homegrown training program, Kepler University, to 63 courses including 3 "graduate" tracks.

Read More

Digital pioneer Infectious Media joins Kepler Group

The deal creates an industry leader that helps marketers navigate the seismic, technology-driven changes impacting how brands connect with consumers.

Read More

Augmented Insights make it easier to read the signals

The KIP Augmented Insights tool delivers a custom feed of automated campaign analyses, decreasing the time to generate actionable insights by 90%.

Read More

How DTC transformation drove +79% digital revenue

The pandemic turned digital transformation from a growth tactic to a necessity for survival. Learn from a brand that did it well.

Read More

Marketing in a post-COVID world

Analyzing the impact of COVID across consumer patterns, media prices, and messaging to adjust to the new normal

Read More

Kepler at Home: Rick Greenberg

The sweet sound of teamwork.

Read More

Kepler at Home: Rebecca Ryan

Remember your own resilience

Read More

Assessing COVID-19’s impact on TV and OTT/CTV ecosystem

Highlighting expected challenges, opportunities and impacts.

Read More

Kepler at Home: Elizabeth Meola

Life in the little things.

Read More

Marketing for the common good

Marketers wield incredible power. With strategy, data, and technology, we create programs that influence people, shape opinions, and change behaviors.

Read More

Kepler at Home: Justin Sous

Staying close while physically apart

Read More

Tailoring video campaigns to business goals

As the video ecosystem expands, channel & partner complexity has become more difficult to navigate. Read about our recommended approach to video.

Read More

Kepler Launches its 100th Amazon Advertising Client

Kepler just launched its 100th Amazon Advertising client. We're so proud to be delivering impact for Hanes, Zound, WD-40, and so many others.

Read More

DV360 Custom Bidding drives up to +90% ROAS

For the past few months, Kepler has been participating in DV360’s Custom Bidding beta and have seen strong improvements on campaign performance.

Read More

Kepler appointed Tampa General AOR

Tampa General Hospital selects Kepler as its digital media agency and partner, responsible for its full digital media strategy & channel execution.

Read More